Top Six Ways to Prevent Moths From Eating Your Clothes

Moths eating your clothes can give your wardrobe a raggedy, tattered look.  It’s the sort of minor annoyance that can make a huge difference on how people view you.  Before you start looking for a new apartment, you should consider the following ways of preventing moths eating you clothes.

  1. Moth Balls: This is, of course, the classic way of preventing moths eating your clothes.  It certainly does the job.  Unfortunately, however, it comes at a cost.  First, mothballs produce an unpleasant, even repugnant smell and which is far more than you want to deal with on a day-to-day basis.  Second, and more importantly, there are health concerns.  Mothballs are toxic and just the right shape and size to invite tiny hands to take them and pop them in tiny mouths.  If you have small children, the health concerns are enough in themselves to make you think thrice about mothballs.  

  2. Clean Clothes before Long Storage:  Moths don’t usually infest clothes that you use often and wash.  They tend to prefer to infest clothes that you have put away in some dark corner and left untouched for while.  Therefore, before you put away your winter clothes, you should make sure to wash all of them and to dry clean things like coats and thick woolen items.  The smell of our sweat is one of the beacons that attract moths to your clothing.  If you wash these off beforehand, you are less likely to have moths lay their eggs in the folds of your clothes.

  3. Place Clothing in Space Bags: You may have seen late night commercials for those airtight plastic wraps that make it easier to store large quantities of items in small more efficient spaces.  These bags are not only space savers; they also prevent moths eating your clothes.  These space bags create a great defense against moths because they not only deny moths direct access to your clothes but they also shut away smells that help lead moths to your clothing and cut off the oxygen base that larvae that have already infested your clothing need to survive.

  4. Lavender and Rosemary: An old folk way makes the case for a mixture of lavender and rosemary as a much more pleasant form of moth deterrent.  Supposedly, if you hang permeable bags of this about your clothes, the scent will ward off moth infection.  The efficacy of this method remains in question, but we will make no challenge to the claim that it is the most pleasant smelling of all the methods listed here.  In addition, even if you do not get rid of moths, you will certainly add a natural perfume to your closet that may make the attempt worth it on its own olfactory terms.

  5. Dry Clean and Relocate: If you already have moth larvae eating your clothing, then the best course of action is to have your clothing dry-cleaned and then to find another location for them.  The dry cleaning not only removes the smells that attracted moths to your clothing in the first place, but will also eradicate the moths that have taken up residence in folds of your favorite sweater.  Of course, this action only works if you dry clean before you relocate, otherwise you will only be spreading the problem to other closets and giving the moth larvae whole new fabrics on which to feed.

  6. Clean the Closet: The other consideration is the closet itself.  If you had moths in a closet and you returned dry cleaned clothes to it, the moths may re-infect your clothing.  Therefore, before you return your clothes to the same place where it became infected in the first place, you should buy moth-killing chemicals and kill the moths at that location.  This will help prevent further infestation.

 

 

 

 


  • How To Kill Moths Home
  • |
  • Green Moth
  • |
  • Household Moths
  • |
  • Moth Repellents
  • |
  • Moths Eating Clothes
  • |
  • Moth Balls Danger
  • |
  • Moth Ball Smell
  • |
  • Site Map
  • |
  • Terms of Use
  • |
  • Privacy Policy